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Posts Tagged ‘office2013’

On Office with App-V: Planning for a Virtual Office Deployment

April 16, 2015 1 comment

Microsoft Office: A flagship product suite ubiquitous within the enterprise. The average enterprise IT environment runs multiple versions of Office not only as a suite of applications for the average information worker, but also as a platform for custom and mission critical LOB applications and workflows. As Office continues to grow or evolve, the question of whether or not to virtualize all or parts of one or more versions of Office are revisited on a regular basis.

Reasons to Use App-V with Office

There are many significant reasons why you would want to deploy office through App-V. Some of the more common are:

  1. Legacy Add-in Version Isolation through Virtualization: Office is also constantly evolving. As a new version is released, applications that work with or interact with an Office application may not work on a new version of an Office application. For example, you may have a legacy Add-in that works on Excel 2007, but does not work on Excel 2013. For that reason you create an App-V package that contains Excel 2007 along with that legacy add-in (or linked through connection groups.) This allows the application add-in/plug-in to continue to be used alongside of the newer deployment.

  2. Temporary Coexistence: Multiple versions of most Office applications can run side-by-side with a few caveats smoother with App-V than with native deployments. While App-V can be used with many applications to run multiple versions of the same applications, Office has some additional guidance [which will be discussed in a later blog in much greater depth.]

  3. Package Modernization Strategy Alignment: App-V allows for Office to be delivered via streaming in a flexible, portable format and take advantage of features of App-V such as the Shared Content Store.

In many cases, the version of Office you choose to virtualize will align with the reasoning. For example, you may be involved with a deployment of Windows 8.1 with Office 2013, and to ease transition, deliver an App-V package of Office 2010 applications for temporary use. You could also deploy Office 2013 via App-V to an existing Windows 7 base running Office 2010 due to a change in packaging strategy.

A Little History

A common question asked revolves around which versions of Office can be virtualized and what specific limitations will be encountered. To answer this – even at a 50,000 foot level – involves a historical discussion to better understand how the process and guidelines evolved with customer desires. As a result, the history affects version capabilities when running under App-V.

Office 2003/2007

Back in the day, when App-V was called Softgrid, prescriptive guidance documents were published on how to sequence Office 2003 and Office 2007 with Softgrid. It was a complicated process, but the isolation allowed for the resolution of some compatibility issues. There were a few caveats:

  • Applications could not self-heal.

  • Integration was limited without disabling some virtual subsystems.

  • Volume-licensed installation media was required.

There were other limitations involving client-server capabilities as well. When App-V 4.x and 5.x were released, no additional integration was developed due to the age of these products. Still generally, in most cases, these versions of Office are virtualized primarily for legacy add-in scenarios where only specific Office applications are packaged with App-V (Excel, Access, etc.) and they can still be done with success.

Office 2010

With Office 2010 came a few changes that would affect how Office would be deployed with App-V. First, Office moved over to the software protection platform that previously only used for operating system product activation. As with previous versions of Office, only volume-licensed media was supported for sequencing. In addition, a special component needed to be laid down natively in order to allow the activation of Office through either MAK (Multiple Activation Keys) keys or through a KMS (Key Management Server) Server. Hosts activated via a KMS have to report back to that key server once every 180 days. Like with the native Office format, you could also verify activation status with the OSPP.VBS script.

In addition to the software protection platform, the native component (which would become known as the ODK – Office Deployment Kit) included special virtualization handlers (or proxies) that would allow for better Office integration than we had before (MAPI, Search, SharePoint, OneNote) with previous versions of Office with App-V. This special integration allowed for the base applications to remain isolated but have better native integration with enterprise components. This would become a fine line to walk. Isolation is the opposite of integration. It is impossible to fully have both. The ODK would become the best solution.

2010 – App-V was not Click-2-Run

Beginning with Office 2010, a new format that was based on App-V technology was introduced for only Microsoft Office Home and Student 2010, Microsoft Office Home and Business 2010, and Microsoft Office Starter 2010. This was a portable streaming solution called Click-2-Run or Click-to-Run. Click-to-Run was not available in the Enterprise initially and was not to be confused with the enterprise deployment of Office using App-V. Click-to-Run behaved like a native Office installation to the introduction of dynamic virtualization technologies thus, in essence, it was simply an alternative installation format that allowed for speedy quick deployment and/or upgrades to Office 2010 for consumer users.

2013 – App-V IS Click-2-Run

Well, kind of. It comes from Click-2-Run. With the success of Office 2010 Click-to-Run, the birth of Office 365 and subscription-based deployments, and the desire for better virtual integration within the Windows shell on top of the existing integration components brought forth the solution for Office 2013 – flattened Click-to-Run.

The ODT

Instead of having to manually sequence the Office package, you will use the ODT (Office Deployment Toolkit) to download and create (flatten) the APPV package. The Click-to-Run download from Microsoft will serve as the APPV package once it has been flattened. The packaging process with flattening involves converted the STREAM.DAT file into the AppV package format alongside of generating the registries and manifests. Finally an INTEGRATOR.EXE component is embedded into the package and configure to deploy automatically via a package script when the APPV package is deployed. This integrator is the next generation of the virtualization handlers that were introduced with App-V 4 and Office 2010 integration.

The Office Deployment Toolkit is periodically updated and is also the primary tool for updating the App-V package. The flattener component puts in a permanent package GUID that simplifies updating and allows for updating with the Office 365 update cycle which is in line with patch Tuesday. The Office Deployment Toolkit is also the mechanism for determining which Office applications are part of your overall Office package.

While the Office 2013 AppV package originates with Click-to-Run from the Office365 CDN, starting with Service Pack 2 of App-V 5, the App-V package can also be activated via Volume Licensing as well as Office 365 subscription licensing. This means that the Office AppV package is now the most flexible option for licensing as it is the only package format that can be activated through either subscription or volume licensing. Bear in mind the activation method will be embedded into the package upon flattening.

Dynamic Virtualization

The Office 2013 APPV package was also the first introduction to JITV (Just-in-Time Virtualization) or what is known as “dynamic virtualization.” This allowed for better shell integration and enhanced the behavior of the virtualization handler components through tighter integrated extension points. This would be available for other AppV applications beginning with App-V 5 Service Pack 2.

In Essence, the newer the version of Office is, the tighter the integration options are. This allows for Office to be incorporated into your overall App-V application factory where the new Office can be leveraged for primary use under App-V while legacy versions can be leveraged (and) isolated for special circumstances.

Free Office 2013 App-V Deployment Training now Available on Microsoft Virtual Academy

December 11, 2014 Leave a comment

This week, we have released more guidance on deploying Office 2013 with App-V 5.0 through MVA. In this 4 module course, I discuss licensing, planning, package Creation, deployment, and caveats when delivering Office 2013 through App-V 5.

The full course content can be found here:

http://www.microsoftvirtualacademy.com/training-courses/deploying-office-2013-with-app-v

If you want to bypass the course and just view the videos, you can do that on Channel 9 directly using the links below:

App-V 5: Creating and Testing Office 2013 Connection Groups in Stand-Alone Mode

June 4, 2014 4 comments

App-V 5 has evolved significantly since its initial release in the fall of 2012. Many of these changes have had an effect on how the Office 2013 AppV Package interacts with the Explorer shell and, as a result, have created a challenge for those of us (like me) who like to first test Connection Groups which contain the Office 2013 AppV package.

I find testing Connection Groups first in standalone mode very valuable because I can confirm that the connection group works and get fine tune the application package order as needed when I am testing and debugging Connection Groups. I can then test the deployment though the App-V Publishing Server or through Configuration Manager once I have validated that the Connection Group works.

TO quickly review how to create a connection group in stand-alone mode, you must first publish the packages. In the case of Office, I will publish the Office package globally as well as the add-ins I am testing. After the packages have been published, I can then proceed to create the connection group.

You create the Connection Group using the Add-AppVClientConnectionGroup cmdlet and you enable it (matching target) using the Enable-AppVClientConnectionGroup cmdlet. The Add-AppVClientConnectionGroup requires the creation of an XML descriptor document which is documented here: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj713474.aspx

Since the user state and launch management will be changing, the packages must not be in use. The thing is, you will find in App-V 5.0 SP2 and later, that once you try to enable the Connection Group, it fails with the following error – even though you have not launched any Office application:

The operation was successful but at least one of the Virtual Processes in this Connection Group is currently in use. Please shutdown all Virtual Processes in the Connection Group in order to complete this operation.

Operation attempted: Enable Connection Group.

AppV Warning Code: 0200000510

Sure enough, when you run the Get-AppVClientPackage command, you will see that the Office 2013 Package is indeed already in use. How is that possible you ask? Because of Dynamic Virtualization and the fact that Explorer is processed using virtual components by default. This is to enable support for enhanced shell extensions as well as applications that hook into Explorer directly such as OneDrivePro.

If you try to run the Stop-AppvClientPackage command against the Office 2013 package, you will find that it kills Explorer, which in turn automatically restarts, thus re-triggering the package back in use. You will also notice that the Connection Group enablement task does not show up under pending tasks in the HKLMSoftwareMicrosoftAppVClientPendingTasks.

What you have to do is turn off Dynamic Virtualization and remove Explorer.exe temporarily from the ProcessesUsingVirtualComponents value in the registry: (HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMicrosoftAppVClientVirtualization)

I use these series of PowerShell commands:

First, I turn things off:

PS C:WINDOWSsystem32> Set-AppvClientConfiguration -ProcessesUsingVirtualComponents 0 -EnableDynamicVirtualization 0

I then reboot or restart the AppV Client service.

I then create and enable the Connection Group using the Add-AppVClientConnectionGroup and Enable-AppVClientConnectionGroup cmdlets:

Finally, I reset things back the way they were using the following PowerShell command:

PS C:WINDOWSsystem32> Set-AppvClientConfiguration -EnableDynamicVirtualization 1 -ProcessesUsingVirtualComponents %SystemRoot%Explorer.exe,"%ProgramFiles%Internet Exploreriexplore.exe","%ProgramFiles(x86)%Internet Exploreriexplore.exe"

I then reboot or restart the AppV Client service and test the Connection Group functionality.

App-V @ #msTechEd 2014 – View the recordings in case you missed it!

May 17, 2014 3 comments

We had quite a few breakout sessions on App-V at TechEd North America this year! If you were there and were not able to attend all of them or missed TechEd altogether, you can view the recorded sessions here on Channel 9:

My Presentation 🙂

Sizing App-V 5.0: Planning and Designing a Highly Available, Scalable, and Resilient Management and Delivery System

https://channel9.msdn.com/Events/TechEd/NorthAmerica/2014/WIN-B360#fbid=

Then we have an excellent presentation by Briton Zircher on deploying Office 2013 with App-V 5:

Everything You Need to Know for a Successful Microsoft Office 2013 App-V Deployment

https://channel9.msdn.com/Events/TechEd/NorthAmerica/2014/WIN-B330#fbid=

You also will want to see Project VRC's presentation on their independent performance analysis of App-V 5.

Project Virtual Reality Check: Microsoft App-V 5.0 Performance, Tuning, and Optimization (App-V PTO)

https://channel9.msdn.com/Events/TechEd/NorthAmerica/2014/WIN-B362#fbid=

Are you thinking about or planning to deploy App-V 5 with Citrix XenDesktop and studio integration? You will want to see this:

Deploying Microsoft App-V 5.0 and Citrix XenDesktop 7

https://channel9.msdn.com/Events/TechEd/NorthAmerica/2014/WIN-B215#fbid=

New to Intune? Want to understand how applications are managed with Intune? Want to know your App-V options with Intune, check out this presentation:

Application Management with Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager and Windows Intune

https://channel9.msdn.com/Events/TechEd/NorthAmerica/2014/PCIT-B323#fbid=

Finally, my favorite of the event – done by the Virtual Vibe guy himself -Thamim Karim:

The Circle of Life for an App-V 5.0 Package: From Sequence to Termination

https://channel9.msdn.com/events/TechEd/NorthAmerica/2014/WIN-B355#fbid=

App-V: Still More on Those Office Add-ins

August 7, 2013 4 comments

As you can tell, I have been obsessed with Office Add-ins lately. Shifting gears from troubleshooting, I would like to address the different approaches to virtualizing add-ins with App-V. While the last two articles on the subject could easily be applied to both App-V 4.x and 5.x, my focus today will be specifically on App-V 5 because it offers more options and flexibility in the virtualization of add-ins. As I discuss each method, I will give my thoughts on the advantages and disadvantages of each method.

The Most Obvious: Sequence the Application and Add-in Together

While this method may seem to be the easiest, this method is only viable from a servicing standpoint if you:

  • Have only one deployment of the application.
  • In the case of Office, everybody will use the same group of Office applications.
  • Everybody needs and/or is allowed access to the included add-in(s).
  • For App-V 5, all add-ins will use the same COM settings inside the dynamic configuration files.

With this method, we do not likely run into issues with user state data and we do not have to involve any complicated sequencing recipes (other than the ones you would be using anyway – as the case with Office.)

Local Office Brought into Virtual Add-in Package during Sequencing

In this scenario, the add-in is totally virtualized but the parent application (Office App) is native. During sequencing, shortcut extension points were added to the package (dynamic configuration and FB0) so these shortcuts will launch inside the same virtual environment as the add-in. This scenario works best when there is a desire to keep the parent application native to the operating system.

 

The extension point format in the Deployment_Config.XML points to the local instance using a tokenized path. In the example below, here is a local shortcut extension point for Excel 2010 that is labeled as “Contoso Processing” because it will launch inside the virtual environment of the virtualized Contoso Processing add-in.

        <Extension Category=”AppV.Shortcut”>

          <Shortcut>

            <File>[{Start Menu}]Microsoft OfficeExcel (ContosoProcessing).lnk</File>

            <Target>[{ProgramFilesx86}]Microsoft OfficeOffice14excel.exe</Target>

            <Icon>[{ProgramFilesx86}]Microsoft OfficeOffice14excel.exe.0.ico</Icon>

            <Arguments />

            <WorkingDirectory>[{ProgramFilesx86}]Microsoft OfficeOffice14</WorkingDirectory>

            <ApplicationId>[{ProgramFilesx86}]Microsoft OfficeOffice14excel.exe</ApplicationId>

          </Shortcut>

        </Extension>

 

The problem you may run into when using this deals with user workflow. This particular shortcut will launch this specific instance of Excel, but a regular shortcut to the local Excel will only launch the native Excel (with whatever native Excel customizations are in place.) You will not be able to share user state across the two instances of Excel unless you leverage UE-V or another user state solution.

 

Local Office Brought into Virtual Environment using “On-the-Fly” Shortcut

Yes, it’s a long name, but it was the best I could come up with! What happens here is very similar to the previous method where the local/native installation of Office is brought into the virtual environment but not using an embedded shortcut. Instead, we are using an “on-the-fly” shortcut solution where the shortcut leverages the following syntax:

 

<AppName.EXE /appve:<GUID>_<GUID>

This is convenient and quick way to link a local application with a virtual plug-in or add-in. Before you jump to this option, understand there are a few potential issues that could arise. The first will be the provisioning and management of these “out-of-band” shortcuts. Delivery of these shortcuts would have to come outside of the normal publishing block. You also will have to modify these shortcuts whenever a package version has changed. Also user state, registry opacity, and other configuration-relation issues could arise as you have similar issues with this method as you did with the previous one if you are moving back and forth between a local instance and one that has been brought into the virtual environment of the add-in.

Virtual Office Linked with Virtual Package using a Connection Group.

With the introduction of Connection Groups in App-V 5, we now have more flexibility in linking different packages together into a single virtual environment. The most common way of using connection groups to link Office applications with Add-ins is to create one that links Office as a virtual application with the virtual add-in applications.

Once you introduce connection groups into the mix, the order of packages in the connection group is important. This is regardless of how you are deploying these groups (publishing server, configuration manager, or stand-alone.) The connection group order specifies the order in which registry and file system data of individual packages are merged. What this means if Office is first in the connection group and the Add-in package is second, the Office application will take precedence in terms of registry opacity.

Local Office Application Brought into Virtual Package Using Empty package/Connection Group Solution

This is very similar to the above scenario except the assets for the local Office applications are local.

 

In this scenario, Office is installed locally/natively but there is an empty virtual package that contains local shortcuts to the Office applications. This virtual package is linked with the virtual add-in package through a connection group. The ramifications are combined in that you may encounter workflow issues for users. Connection group order will also be important in terms of user state and registry opacity.

Local Office application brought into the Virtual Add-in Package using “Run Virtual”

If you are working within RDS environments, and have a package that is published globally, you can also take advantage of the “Run Virtual” feature. You basically add process executable names as subkeys of the following key:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMicrosoftAppVClientRunVirtual

For example, if I have a locally installed application called MyApp.exe and I would like this application to run within the virtual environment, I would create a subkey called MyApp.exe (perhaps a helper application like Adobe Acrobat that may need to be called from a virtualized web application.) I would then put in as the default entry a REG_SZ value that contains the package GUID and the version GUID separated by an underscore (i.e. <GUID>_<GUID>.

If the package is a standalone package, the process will be launched in that package’s virtual environment. If the package is in a connection group, the process will be launched in the virtual environment of the connection group for which the package belongs.

 

 

 

 

App-V: On that Failed Office Add-in

July 25, 2013 5 comments

Troubleshooting virtualized Office add-ins are always fun. Correction: troubleshooting Office add-ins are always fun for people like me – not necessarily normal human beings. Whether you are using add-ins with a local instance of Office or are packaging add-ins with virtualized Office, you need to be to understand how Office knows which add-ins to load and how these will be loaded.

There are generally three ways to virtualize add-ins for Office:

1.)    Where Office is installed locally and the Add-in is virtualized – The Office application must have a shortcut/OSD file provisioned in order to be brought into the virtual environment. Starting with App-V 4.6 SP2, the App-V Sequencer has a specific workflow that allows for this.

Be advised that when you do this, you will be bringing in the local instance of Office into the virtual environment in order to load the add-in. What this can lead to is other add-ins which may not be virtualized not loading if the configuration is not set properly for this. Having a clear understanding of your Office add-in ecosystem will help in developing a strategy in advance to avoid this.

2.)    Through Connection Groups or Dynamic Suite Composition (Depending on the Version) –  You can also take advantage of both the Add-in/Plug-in workflow and the “Expand Package to Local Disk” feature of the sequencer in order to package Office and Add-in applications separately but still connect them into a common virtual environment.

This method works best (in my opinion) when your strategy is to virtualize both Office and the add-ins. This is also the only way I use Add-ins with Office 2013.

3.)    Office and add-ins packaged together into one package (often sequenced using a single pass.) This way is the least common and not always recommended as it may require you to deploy multiple Office packages.

Verify the Add-in Registry Keys

When an add-in is installed, it can be registered to either the user or to the whole machine. When an add-in is sequenced, it will also be virtualized and depending on the registry opacity configuration, will override whatever is locally present. User-registered add-ins go to HKEY_CURRENT_USER while add-ins registered to the entire machine go to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE. Whether Office is local and being brought into the virtual environment or Office is virtualized with the Add-in, Office needs to be able to understand the “Load Behavior” of the add-in. This will be found under

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESoftwareMicrosoftOffice<APPLICATION>Addins

Each Add-in appears as a subkey beneath this key. The LoadBehavior DWORD value determines how it will load. This key is the #1 culprit when it comes to Add-ins not working right whether it is a “1st launch-only” issue or an “always-launch” issue. It is a DWORD value. By default, this entry is set to 3, which specifies that the add-in is loaded at startup but an many cases, especially if the add-in was launched during sequencing, you may run into a situation where the value may be set to something else depending on what was done during sequencing. If the value is 0, then the add-in will have to be enabled once the user launches the application. If the package is repaired it will have to be enabled again. The value 1 can be misleading and I encounter this a lot in virtual add-in troubleshooting. Add-ins dialog box indicates that the add-in is loaded after the application starts, the add-in isn’t actually loaded. If the application successfully loads the add-in, the LoadBehavior value changes to 0, and remains at 0 after the application closes. The value 2 means If the application successfully loads the add-in, the LoadBehavior value changes to 3, and remains at 3 after the application closes. With App-V this means potential issues in prompts including annoying “success messages.”

LoadBehavior at 3 is good for App-V

Hey, I made a rhyme!  If the LoadBehavior value is set to 3, it will always try to load the add-in and if the add-in fails, will set it back to 2. This is what we want in the virtual registry of our App-V package most of the time. You can usually verify/set this in the Virtual Registry tab after sequencing prior to saving the package.

Should I Verify Registry Opacity?

Yes. While you are there you may want to verify your registry opacity settings. Are those Add-in keys set to “override” or “merge” with the local key. If you have local add-ins that you will use alongside of these virtual add-ins, you will want to ensure that the Addin key is set to merge.

What about Outlook Add-Ins?

For Outlook, you will most assuredly need to manually import/add these virtual registry entries during sequencing (or package upgrade) since you do not want to be launching Outlook during sequencing.

Check the Event Logs when Troubleshooting

While the event logs may not have the event handlers registered for office (since it is virtual, you will still see unregistered event ID’s of Outlook (Event ID 45) which will list all of the add-ins loaded and their subsequent load times.

Event ID: 45

Outlook loaded the following add-in(s)

Office 2013 and Mismatched Virtual Subsystem Settings

If you are using Virtual Office 2013 with App-V 5, this is the #1 issue. Given all of the changes with Office 2013 virtualization, one would think the Add-in story would become complicated. It is not. The recommended practices are pretty straight-forward:

On the Sequencing Machine:

1.)    Install the App-V 5 Sequencer.

2.)    Install Office 2013.

3.)    Start a new package.

4.)    On the “Type of Application” page, select “Add-on or Plug-in.”

5.)    Select the installer for the plugin.

6.)    In the “Install Primary” page, select “I have installed the primary parent program” and continue.

7.)    Install the plugin and save the package.

8.)    Depending on the add-in, you may need to run it during sequencing.

 

Client Configuration

1.)    Copy your Office 2013 to the client machine

2.)    Copy the sequenced add-in to the client machine

3.)    Modify the add-in’s DeploymentConfig.xml file and modify the following:

4.)    Search for:

“<COM Mode=”Isolated”>”

modify to

“<COM Mode=”Integrated”>”

5.)    Search for:

“<Objects Enabled=”true” />”

modify to

“<Objects Enabled=”false” />”

The Connection Group will fail if the above changes are not made.

6.)    Build a Connection Group document for both Office 2013 and the Add-In. You can do this with stand-alone testing by using the following resource on creating a Connection Group XML document: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj713474.aspx

7.)    Enable Package Scripts

Set-AppvClientConfiguration -EnablePackageScripts 1

8.)    Add the Office 2013 package; publish it Globally

Add-AppvClientPackage –path <path_to_office_package_>.APPV | Publish-AppvClientPackage –Global

9.)    Add the Add-In package; publish it Global

Add-AppvClientPackage –path <path_to_office_addin>.APPV | Publish-AppvClientPackage –Global

10.) Add the Connection Group pointing to the Connection Group document you created earlier. Enable it Globally

Add-AppvClientConnectionGroup –path <PATH_TO_CG_DOC>.xml |Enable-AppvClientConnectionGroup –Global

 11.) Launch the Office application the add-in uses.

 

Office 2013: Deployment and Migration Resources

February 1, 2013 4 comments

Now that Office 2013 is generally available, it is time for many organizations who are currently using a virtualized instance of Office to start considering a move to Office 2013. As you may have read in the following Microsoft KB article http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2772509 (Supported scenarios for deploying Microsoft Office as a sequenced App-V Package) Office 365 ProPlus will be leveraging the Office Deployment Tool for Click-to-Run so administrators will be importing the Office ProPlus (Click-To-Run) .APPV package right into App-V 5.0. No sequencing is required because App-V 5.0 provides integration with local applications natively through native Virtual Application Extensions.

UPDATE: As of App-V 5 SP2 – This is extended to Volume License ProPlus as well.

I have compiled the following resources into one simple location so you can proceed to read up on getting to migrate and deploy the new version of Office in the Enterprise whether you decide to install it locally or virtual through Click-to-Run. I've been using the new Office for a year now and I love it!

UPDATE: This page has been updated as new resources come available. I'm now almost two years into it and I still love it!

Description of Microsoft Office 2013 Service Pack 1 (SP1)
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2817430

Service Pack 1 for Microsoft Office 2013 (KB2817430) 32-Bit Edition
http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=42017

Service Pack 1 for Microsoft Office 2013 (KB2817430) 64-Bit Edition
http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=42006

App-V 5.0 SP2 Support for Office 2013 Volume Licensing Editions
http://blogs.technet.com/b/office_resource_kit/archive/2013/12/02/announcing-app-v-5-0-sp2-support-for-office-2013-volume-licensing-editions.aspx

What’s New in Office Professional Plus 2013?
http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=36191

What's New in Lync 2013?
http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=36181

What's New in Excel 2013?
http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=36185

What's New in PowerPoint 2013?
http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=36193

What’s New in Access 2013?
http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=36189

What's New in Outlook 2013?
http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=36187

Office 2013 Technical Library in Compiled Help
http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=30389

Changes in Office 2013
http://technet.microsoft.com/library/cc178954(v=office.15)

Setup properties in Office 2013
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc179018.aspx

Configuring a Silent Install of Office 2013
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/subscriptions/dd630736.aspx

Office 2013 Administrative Template files (ADMX/ADML) and Office Customization Tool
http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=35554

Office Customization Tool (OCT) in Office 2013
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc179097(office.15).aspx

Planning for Group Policy in Office 2013
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc179077.aspx

Integrating additional cloud storage services in Office 2013
http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=35474

Downloadable eBook: Deployment guide for Office 2013
http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=30388

Telemetry in Office 2013: A new way to Assess Office Compatibility
http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=34991

Microsoft Office 2013 Discovery and Risk Assessment Preview
http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=30444

Office Migration Planning Manager (OMPM): Office Compatibility
http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=11454

Configure user settings for Office 2013
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc178990.aspx

Microsoft Office 2013 Volume License Pack
http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=35584

Deployment Options for Office 2013
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee624360.aspx#Virtualization

Download: Office Customization Tool for Click-to-Run
http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=36778

Customizing Office 2013 using the Office Click-to-Run Deployment Tool
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj219424(v=office.15)

Customization Overview for Click-to-Run
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj219428(v=office.15)

Identity and Authentication in the cloud: Office 2013 and Office 365 (Poster)
http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=38193

Supported scenarios for deploying Microsoft Office as a sequenced App-V Package
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2772509

Microsoft Office Support in Microsoft User Experience Virtualization (UE-V)
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2841206

Office 365

Managing Updates for Office 365 ProPlus – Part 1
http://blogs.technet.com/b/office_resource_kit/archive/2014/01/21/managing-updates-for-office-365-proplus-part-1.aspx

Managing Updates for Office 365 ProPlus – Part 2
http://blogs.technet.com/b/office_resource_kit/archive/2014/01/28/managing-updates-for-office-365-proplus-part-2.aspx

Test Lab Guide: Configuring and Office 365 Subscription
http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=41548

FastTrack Office 365 Deployment Guide
http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=41678

SkyDrive Pro for Windows Download
http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=39050

 Office Scrub – Cleaning Up Older Versions of Office and Remnants
http://blogs.technet.com/b/odsupport/archive/2011/04/08/how-to-obtain-and-use-offscrub-to-automate-the-uninstallation-of-office-products.aspx